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Crafting a future in Serbia

Azar is from Pakistan, Bilal is a Kurd from the Syrian city of Qamishli, and Mohamed is from Mogadishu, Somalia. Azar speaks English and a little Serbian, Bilal communicates only in Arabic, and Mohamed, who frequently jumps in as a translator, speaks English and Arabic.But when the three of them are in the IOM Serbia carpentry workshop, they do not need words and languages; the understand each other instinctively.

Crafting a Future in Serbia

Azar, Bilal and Mohamed are a strange trio – one that could only be fashioned and created in the great workshop of life.

Azar is from Pakistan, Bilal is a Kurd from the Syrian city of Qamishli, and Mohamed is from Mogadishu, Somalia. Azar speaks English and a little Serbian, Bilal communicates only in Arabic, and Mohamed, who frequently jumps in as a translator, speaks English and Arabic.

Bringing Back the Smiles

Unlike younger men from Arab, Asian and certain African countries – whose presence in Serbia stopped being surprising years ago – it is uncommon to come across migrant families. We take a look at how IOM Serbia helps then on their journey, and puts a smile back on the faces of the children.

Bringing Back the Smiles

You don't see many migrant families in Serbia. Younger men from Arab, Asian and certain African countries – their presence in Serbia stopped being surprising years ago. There are, however, about 150 families from Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, and Africa, at the Šid Reception Centre in the north of the country. The numbers change from day to day, as some arrive, and others leave

The parents are weary from the thwarted attempts to cross the border, physically and financially exhausted, worried about the future, but the children are cheerful and smiling.

Labour Migration Patterns, Policies and Migration Propensity in the Western Balkans

Date of publication: 
Nov 01, 2009
The Western Balkan countries remain an area of interest to those with a stake in migration issues. Despite the region’s common recent history, the Western Balkans are very diverse as regards migration issues: some are plagued by poverty and high unemployment rates that generate large outflows of migrants, while others already attract immigrants to fill the labour shortages in certain booming sectors of their economy.

Needs Assessment: Human Trafficking in the Western Balkans

Date of publication: 
Jan 01, 2014
In September 2013, through the support of the IOM Development Fund, a seven-month needs assessment on the human trafficking situation in the Western Balkans (Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina [BiH], UNSC resolution 1244-administered Kosovo, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro and Serbia) was commissioned. The purpose was to collect and summarize stakeholder views of the mechanisms and resources available to combat TIP in the region.